Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 for the management of functional abdominal pain in childhood

A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 93 children, aged 6-15 years, and with functional abdominal pain (Rome III criteria). The interventions were a chewable tablet with L. reuteri DSM 17938 at a dose of 10^8 cfu/day (n=47) or the equivalent placebo tablet (n=46), once daily. The intervention period was 4 weeks, with follow-up after another 4 weeks. The primary endpoints were frequency and intensity of  abdominal pain.

 

Significant relief in frequency and severity of abdominal pain

Significant relief in frequency (p<0.02) and severity (p<0.01) of abdominal pain compared to placebo at 4 weeks. Continuously and significantly relieved severity of abdominal pain compared to placebo at 8 weeks. Reduced incidence of perceived abdominal distension and bloating compared to placebo at 4 weeks (p=0.013).

Conclusion
L. reuteri Protectis significantly reduced the frequency and severity of functional abdominal pain in children.

Lactobacillus reuteri in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP)

This prospective, double blind, and randomised trial aimed to study if supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri could affect functional abdominal pain (FAP). Children aged 6–16 years were screened for FAP as defined in the Rome III criteria and 60 patients were recruited whereof 56 completed the study. The children were randomly allocated to receive either L. reuteri DSM 17938 (2×108 CFU/day in an oil suspension) or identical placebo for 4 weeks followed by a 4-week follow-up period without supplementation. Frequency and intensity of pain was self-recorded by the subjects.

Pain intensity decreased significantly during the 8 weeks in the L. reuteri group (p<0.001)but not in the placebo group (p>0.05) and was significantly lower than placebo at both 4 and 8 weeks
(p<0.05).

Pain frequency decreased significantly with time during the 8 weeks in both groups (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Supplementation with L. reuteri reduced perceived abdominal pain intensity, and this effect was sustained also in the follow-up period when no probiotic was ingested.

Lactobacillus reuteri in breast milk and infant stool in relation to oral intake

This prospective, randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled study identified factors affecting the prevalence of Lactobacillus reuteri in the faeces and breast milk of 232 mothers with a history of atopic disease, and in the faeces of their babies after oral supplementation with Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC 55730.

Women were randomly assigned to take either Lactobacillus reuteri or placebo for the last 4 weeks of their pregnancy. Their babies continued with the same study product from birth until 12 months of age. The prevalence of Lactobacillus reuteri was higher in the faeces of infants whose mothers had taken the active supplement compared with those whose mothers had taken placebo.

The highest prevalence was recorded at 5–6 days of age (82% in treated vs. 20% in placebo; p<0.001). The first expressed breast milk (colostrum) was positive for Lactobacillus reuteri in 12% of the mothers given Lactobacillus reuteri and in 2% of mothers in the placebo group. Breast-feeding seemed to reduce faecal Lactobacillus reuteri counts while antibiotics did not appear to have any effect. Lactobacillus reuteri supplementation did not appear to affect bifidobacteria or C. difficile colonisation.

Lactobacillus reuteri can be detected in breast milk after oral supplementation to the mother and in almost all infants after oral supplementation during the first year of life. Lactobacillus reuteri can also occasionally be detected in the faeces of untreated infants.

 

Conclusion:
Lactobacillus reuteri can be detected in breast milk after oral supplementation to the mother and in almost all infants after oral supplementation during the first year of life. Lactobacillus reuteri can also occasionally be detected in the faeces of untreated infants.